Gardening Calendar (Australian Temperate Climate) – October

October is the mid-spring period, flowers bloom in abundance, the warmer weather with rain bringing ideal conditions for lush plant growth. The cold weather hasn’t quite finished yet, cold nights and even frosts can still be expected, along with strong winds, so it’s important to protect tender plants and seedlings.

Things to Do This Month:

  • Plant evergreen shrubs and trees (this includes citrus trees).
  • Relocate evergreen shrubs – they can now regrow their roots during the mild weather.
  • Set up windbreaks (e.g. plastic tree guards) to protect newly planted evergreen trees and shrubs.
  • Plant potted fruit trees and vines (having roots, can be planted anytime, best in spring & autumn).
  • Relocate any self-seeded annuals to better locations in the garden.
  • Tidy up overgrown plants and tie growing vines back to supports or wires.
  • Continue propagating plants by taking cuttings or layering (both ground layering and air layering).
  • Feed brambleberries (raspberries, blackberries & hybrids) and currants.
  • Last chance to remove dead winter growth, and to dig up and divide perennial plants
  • Clean out ponds and water gardens, divide waterlilies, plant new aquatic plants.

 

Vegetables and Herbs to Sow:

Sow in October   Harvest (weeks)
Amaranth ds 7-8
Angelica ds 18 months
Asparagus d 2-3 years
Asparagus Pea d 8-11
Beetroot ds 7-10
Borage ds 8-10
Burdock d 17-18
Cape Gooseberry ds 14-16
Carrot d 12-18
Celeriac s 14-28
Celery s 17-18
Chicory d 16-24
Chinese cabbage ds 8-10
Chives ds 7-11
Climbing beans d 9-11
Coriander d 30-45
Cucumber d 8-10
Daikon d 8-10
Dill d 8-12
Dwarf beans d 7-10
Endive ds 10-11
Fennel d 14-15
French tarragon d 30-40 days
Globe Artichokes s 42-57
Horseradish d 16-24
Jerusalem Artichokes d 15-20
Kohlrabi d 7-10
Lemon balm s 8-10
Lettuce ds 8-12
Marrow d 12-17
Mustard greens d 5-8
NZ Spinach s 8-10
Okra ds 11-14
Oregano s 6-8
Parsley ds 9-19
Parsnip d 17-20
Potato d 15-20
Pumpkin ds 15-20
Radish d 5-7
Rhubarb d 12 months
Rocket d 21-35 days
Rockmelon ds 10-16
Rosella s 21-25
Rosemary d 12 months
Sage d 18 months
Salsify d 14-21
Silverbeet ds 7-12
Spring onions d 8-12
Summer savory d 6-10
Sunflower ds 10-11
Sweet corn ds 11-14
Sweet marjoram s 8-10
Turnip d 6-9
Yacon d 25
Yam/Oka d 15-20

Key:
d = sow directly into ground
s = sow in seed tray
ds = sow directly into ground or seed tray
*= frost tender
**= sow after frost

Download printable PDF version of Gardening Calendar (Australian Temperate Climate) – October

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Gardening Calendar (Australian Temperate Climate) – September

It’s September, the beginning of spring, the time of new life and renewal! The weather is starting to warm up, but there are still cold days, rainy weather and winds to contend with.

Early spring is the best time to mulch garden beds, as the soil is still moist and is slowly warming up.

This month is the last chance to plant bare rooted deciduous trees and shrubs, as they need time to establish before the summer heat arrives. Container grown ones with well developed roots can be planted right through spring.

Things to Do This Month:

  • Plant evergreen shrubs and trees (this includes citrus trees).
  • Relocate evergreen shrubs – they can now regrow their roots during the mild weather.
  • Last chance to plant bare-root deciduous trees, shrubs and vines (otherwise wait till autumn).
  • Feed all fruit trees if you didn’t do so last month.
  • Clean up old growth in perennial herbaceous plants to make room for new growth.
  • Propagate plants by taking cuttings or layering (both ground layering and air layering).
  • Divide perennials, such as chives.
  • Tie canes of brambleberries to wires before the vigorous growth commences in early spring.
  • Plant passionfruit.
  • For seedlings raised indoors in August, harden off by slowly increasing sun and exposure to outside temperatures for 7 to 10 days before planting out.
  • In ponds, begin feeding fish small amounts of food often, so food is not left over to pollute water.

Vegetables and Herbs to Sow:

Sow in September   Harvest (weeks)
Amaranth** ds 7-8
Asparagus d 2-3 years
Asparagus Pea d 8-11
Basil s 10-12
Beetroot ds 7-10
Broccoli ds 10-16
Burdock d 17-18
Cabbage ds 8-15
Cape Gooseberry ds 14-16
Capsicum s 10-12
Carrot d 12-18
Celeriac s 14-28
Celery s 17-18
Chicory d 16-24
Chilli s 9-11
Chives ds 7-11
Climbing beans** d 9-11
Coriander d 30-45
Corn Salad d 5-8
Cucumber d 8-10
Daikon d 8-10
Dill d 8-12
Dwarf beans** d 7-10
Eggplant s 12-15
Endive ds 10-11
Fennel d 14-15
Globe Artichokes s 42-57
Horseradish d 16-24
Jerusalem Artichokes d 15-20
Kohlrabi d 7-10
Leeks ds 15-18
Lettuce ds 8-12
Luffa s 11-12
Marrow* d 12-17
Mint s 8-12
Mustard greens d 5-8
NZ Spinach s 8-10
Oregano s 6-8
Parsley ds 9-19
Parsnip d 17-20
Peas d 9-11
Potato d 15-20
Pumpkin* ds 15-20
Radish d 5-7
Rhubarb d 12 months
Rocket d 21-35 days
Rockmelon* ds 10-16
Sage d 18 months
Salsify d 14-21
Shallots d 12-15
Silverbeet ds 7-12
Snow Peas d 12-14
Spring onions d 8-12
Squash* d 7-8
Sunflower ds 10-11
Sweet corn** ds 11-14
Tomatillo s 10-14
Tomato ds 8-17
Turnip d 6-9
Winter Savory s 6-10
Zucchini* ds 6-9

Key:
d = sow directly into ground
s = sow in seed tray
ds = sow directly into ground or seed tray
*= frost tender
**= sow after frost

Download printable PDF version of Gardening Calendar (Australian Temperate Climate) – September

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Starting Tomato Seedlings Indoors

Tomato_Seedling-IMG_0132-640x480

If you live in Australia’s temperate climates, you can sow your tomato seedlings in late winter (August) – by starting them indoors! It’s in the list of Autumn garden tasks in my gardening calendar!

Starting your tomato seedlings early is a great way to get a good head start of a few weeks before spring arrives. By the time the weather is suitable for planting out the seedlings, you’ll have nice strong plants that will better survive pests and inclement weather!

For step-by-step instructions on starting tomatoes indoors in late winter, see my article: Starting Annual Vegetable Seedlings Indoors

Why wait for the warm weather when you can start now!

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Guest Article – Permaculture The Documentary

I’ve been contacted by Geoffrey and Craig Clitheroe to promote their upcoming film Permaculture The Documentary. In their article they introduce themselves, their work, and give us three sample videos which I’d like to share. I personally found the Permaculture Documentary : Jodie Venetti video incredibly inspiring, hope you enjoy these videos!

 

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Dogs Go Woof Productions is a documentary film company from Perth WA and was founded by twin Brothers Geoffrey and Craig Clitheroe.

They set to change the world through storytelling by challenging the way people think. After reading the book “The Myth Gap” by Alex Evans, Geoff and Craig realised there was an emotional disconnection between people and factual data from science. People can’t relate to science because it is filled with data, with no stories along with it. Craig and Geoff have decided to fill this gap by bringing together facts and emotion. Through storytelling in their documentary films, is their attempt to reconnect people to fact and dispel fiction.

Permaculture The Documentary is their first feature length film merging facts and stories together. The film’s theme centres around Climate Change and how we can as individuals make a difference and live sustainably. Unlike many environmental films, the documentary is designed to inspire people and provide tools that audiences can apply in their own lives.

Permaculture is an ecological design system about working with nature rather than against it. It uses science, systematic thinking and engineering to create more efficient, effective, balanced human settlements while respecting the surrounding environment’s limitations.

The film will be free to stream online. Geoff and Craig believe the message is what is important. “To really make a difference, the film needs to be available to everyone around the world without limitations of where or who it’s available to” said Geoff the Producer of the film.

Normally funds are raised through investors and distributors owning rights to its screenings. Instead Geoff and Craig plan on raising funds through donations and crowdfunding to produce the film so that it’s rights are not limited and available worldwide

You can support the film by following their Facebook page Permaculture: The Documentary https://www.facebook.com/permacultureDoco/ or visiting their website https://www.dogsgowoof.com.au/permaculture-documentary/

 

Permaculture Documentary : Jodie Venetti

https://youtu.be/B7c9SUotJ94

In the suburbs of Perth, Western Australia lies a Permaculture Food Forest grown by Jodie Venetti.

when Jodie discovered permaculture she became really excited about turning her backyard into a food forest. But she soon realised, growing food was one thing, having the time, using all the produce and working a full time job was another. Restricted by responsibility, she decided to throw herself into the challenge to live off her own home-grown garden for a year in a bid to bring her garden fully into her life.
What she gained, she couldn’t have even imagined in the beginning. This is her story.

 

Permaculture Documentary: Charles Otway

https://youtu.be/cWmpUjyXxVc

​Meet Charles Otway former Chemical Engineer and Permaculture Educator in Perth Western Australia.

Charles identifies the challenges with our economic system. From time in people’s lives becoming scarcer,  life becoming less and less diverse and trying to reach the unreachable in life. Discover how Permaculture has can give us another path to better the world’s future.

 

Permaculture Documentary: Craig Printing Company

https://youtu.be/Wur-LCT10Bw

As part of the journey to making Permaculture Documentary series, Craig & Geoff Clitheroe head out to find an eco-friendly printing for the documentary flyers and discovered The Environmental Printing Company.

Owner Craig Campbell tells his story of why they went environmental and what he hopes for the future.

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Gardening Calendar (Australian Temperate Climate) – August

It’s August, the weather is still cold and windy, but the end of winter is draws near, the days begin to grow noticeably longer and the change of season is not too far away.

This month is the last chance to complete the pruning of deciduous trees and shrubs, and for planting raspberries and brambleberries (such as blackberries and their hybrids).

It’s now time to sow the first summer vegetable seeds. Where there’s a danger of frost, sow seeds in trays and place them in a protected area such as a veranda, greenhouse, or indoors near a sunny window.

Towards the end of August, feed fruit trees with organic fertiliser, manure and compost. Also dig these into the soil when preparing new garden beds. The soil life will begin working on the organic plant food and will begin to slowly release its nutrients into the soil after a week or two, ready for the beginning of new spring growth in September. If fruit trees need a feed of potash, late autumn is also the time to do that too.

 

Things to Do This Month:

  • Continue planting deciduous trees, shrubs, vines and cane fruits (and roses!). Wait till spring for planting citrus.
  • Continue pruning deciduous fruit trees (not apricots, best to prune these in late autumn).
  • Continue pruning deciduous shrubs (and roses too if you didn’t prune them in July).
  • Prune dead seed-heads, stems and branches on herbaceous perennial plants.
  • Relocate any deciduous plants (trees, shrubs, vines) or herbaceous perennial plants growing in the wrong place in winter. (Evergreens can only be moved in autumn and early spring, where they have time to regrow roots – remember, they retain leaves in winter which transpire and lose water!).
  • Apply organic fertiliser to fruit trees, so that the slowly released nutrients will become available when the new growth commences in spring.
  • Spray peaches and nectarines to protect against leaf curl fungus. Use lime sulphur or a copper fungicide at the bud swell stage (just before the buds begin to open) but before pink bud stage or colour shows. It is too late to spray once flowering occurs.
  • Feed pot grown shrubs and plants and refresh their potting mix by scraping off the top 2.5cm and replace it with fresh potting mix which has been mixed with slow release fertiliser. Top dressing with compost is also beneficial.

 

Vegetables and Herbs to Sow:

Sow in August   Harvest (weeks)
Asparagus* d 2-3 years
Beetroot ds 7-10
Cabbage ds 8-15
Cape Gooseberry ds 14-16
Capsicum s 10-12
Chilli s 9-11
Eggplant s 12-15
Globe Artichokes s 42-57
Kohlrabi d 7-10
Leeks ds 15-18
Lettuce ds 8-12
Mint s 8-12
Mustard Greens d 5-8
Onion ds 25-34
Parsnip d 17-20
Peas d 9-11
Potato d 15-20
Radish d 5-7
Rocket d 21-35 days
Shallot bulbs d 12-15
Snow Peas d 12-14
Spring Onions d 8-12
Strawberries (seed) s 12 months
Sunflower ds 10-11
Thyme s 42-52
Tomato* ds 8-17
Watermelon* ds 9-14

Key:
d = sow directly into ground
s = sow in seed tray
ds = sow directly into ground or seed tray
*= frost tender
**= sow after frost

Download printable PDF version of Gardening Calendar (Australian Temperate Climate) – August

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Maximum Unsustainability – The Worst Ways to Ride Your Bike

Bike lane

Riding a bike is a sustainable, green, eco-friendly transport option, right? Well, “it’s not what you do, it’s the way that you do it” as the old saying goes. If you want to know how to destroy the planet faster, undermine community spirit and generally be ‘part of the problem’ in all ways possible by riding your bike, then you’ll love this step-by-step guide!

Read the article I wrote for Permaculture Research Institute (PRI) on their website  – “Maximum Unsustainability – The Worst Ways to Ride Your Bike

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Winter Fruit Tree Pruning – Free Workshop

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Winter Fruit Tree Pruning

Free Workshop

Pruning fruit trees may be regarded as an art and a science, but it doesn’t have to be difficult. In fact, it’s fairly easy! Learn how to prune your fruit trees in winter to keep them to a manageable size and maximize fruiting.

Angelo Eliades from Deep Green Permaculture will explain the basic rules of fruit tree pruning, demonstrate how it’s done, and cover winter fruit tree maintenance to reduce pests and diseases.

When: Tuesday 25th July, 7pm-8pm
Where: Nunawading Library, 379 Whitehorse Road, Nunawading
Bookings Essential:  www.winterfruittreepruning.eventbrite.com.au

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