18. What’s Growing in the Garden?

One thing that attracts the curiosity of gardeners is what the next gardener is growing in their garden. An exhaustive documentation of a garden project wouldn’t be complete without a garden plant list.

In light of this I’ve listed below are over 150 “Permaculture plants” that I have growing in the garden, and these are only perennial plants, and then either edible, medicinal or companion plants – I haven’t included any of the annuals (which I do grow, so you won’t find lettuce, tomatoes and carrots listed here, but you will find them in the garden) or any ornamental plants, which the garden is filled with too. The only exception you will notice is the list of aquatic plants, the edible ones are listed separately, the rest are used to create stable aquatic ecosystems.

This list was created in August, 2010, and there are always more plants coming into the garden, as I discover new plants that I can grow here in Melbourne, Australia, and as I exchange and swap plant varieties with fellow Permaculture enthusiasts.

Now that’s all covered, feel free to browse the list of plants in my garden! Enjoy!

Common Name Latin Name
Trees
Apple (Granny Smith) Malus domestica
Apple (Pink Lady) Malus domestica
Apple (Gala) Malus domestica
Apple (Red Jonathan) Malus domestica
Apricot
(dual graft Moorpark – Trevatt)
Prunus armeniaca
Babaco Carica pentagonia
Cherry (Starkrimson) – dwarf Prunus avium
Cherry Guava
(Strawberry Guava)
Psidium littorale
Fig (White) Ficus carica
Grapefruit Citrus paradisi
Lemon (Lisbon) Citrus limon
Lemon (Meyer) Citrus meyeri
Lime (Tahitian) – dwarf Citrus latifolia
Mandarin Citrus reticulata
Mulberry (Black) Morus nigra
Nectarine – dwarf (Nectazee) Prunus persica
Orange (Navelina) – dwarf Citrus sinensis
Orange (Valencia) – dwarf Citrus sinensis
Peach – dwarf (Pixzee) Prunus persica
Pear (Nashi – Nijisseiki) Pyrus pyrifolia
Pear (Williams syn. Bartlett) Pyrus communis
Pineapple Guava (Feijoa) Feijoa sellowiana
Plum (Mariposa) Prunus salicina ‘Mariposa’
Plum (Satsuma) Prunus salicina ‘Satsuma’
Pomegranate Punica granatum
Tamarillo (Orange) Solanum betaceum
Tamarillo (Red) Solanum betaceum
Yellow Guava
(Lemon Guava)
Psidium cattleianum lucidum
Vines, Berries & Other
Blackberry Rubus fruticosus
Blackcurrant Ribes nigrum
Goji Berry Lycium barbarum
Grape (Sultana) Vitus vinifera
Passionfruit (Banana) Passiflora mollissima
Passionfruit (Black) Passiflora edulis
Pepino Solanum muricatum
Raspberry (Everbearing) Rubus idaeus
Raspberry (Large, Late Season) Rubus idaeus
Redcurrant Ribes rubrum
Strawberry Fragaria virginiana
Dragon Fruit Hylocereus undatus
Perennial Root Crops
Jerusalem artichoke Helianthus tuberosus
Potato (Desiree) Solanum tuberosum
Potato (Dargo Goldfield) Solanum tuberosum
Potato (Kestrel) Solanum tuberosum
Potato (Kipfler) Solanum tuberosum
Potato (Red Rascal) Solanum tuberosum
Potato (Russet Burbank) Solanum tuberosum
Taro Colocasia esculenta
Yacon Smallanthus Sonchifolius
Perennial Vegetables
Asparagus Asparagus officinalis
Broccoli (Nine Star) Brassica oleracea botrytis aparagoides
French Sorrel Rumex scutantus
Globe Artichoke Cynara cardunculus
Malabar Spinach Basella alba
Onion Chives Allium schoenoprasum
Perpetual Spinach Beta vulgaris
Purslane Portulaca oleracea
Rhubarb Rheum rhabarbarum
Devil Plant Solanum capsicoides
Culinary Herbs
Basil (Perennial) Ocimum americanum
Cardamom Elettaria cardamomum
French Tarragon Artemisia dracunculus
Mint, Common Mentha spicata
Oregano Origanum vulgare
Sweet Marjoram Origanum majorana
Winter Savory Satureja montana
Edible Aquatics
Arrowhead (Duck Potato) Sagittaria sagittifolia
Chinese Water Chestnut Eleocharis dulcis
Vietnamese Mint Persicaria odorata
Water Celery Oenanthe javanica
Water Spinach (Kangkong) Ipomoea aquatica
Watercress Nasturtium officinale
Aquatics
Aquatic Mint Mentha aquatica
Canadian pondweed (Anacharis) Elodea canadensis
Duckweed Lemna minor
Dwarf Papyrus Cyperus papyrus
Fairy Moss Azolla
Lizards Tail Saururus cernuus
Nardoo (Water Clover) Marselia mutica
Purple Loosestrife Lythrum salicaria
River Buttercup Ranunculus riverularis
Variable Water-milfoil (Varied Milfoil) Myriophyllum variifolium
Water Crassula (Swamp Stonecrop) Crassula helmsii
Water Hyssop Bacopa monniera
Water Iris Iris sp.
Water Lettuce Pistia stratiotes
Water Milfoil Myriophyllum propinquum
Water Poppy Hydrocleys nymphoides
Water Primrose Ludwigia peploides
Waterlilies (Dwarf) Nymphaea species
Herbs & Medicinals
Agrimony Agrimonia eupatoria
Aloe vera Aloe barbadensis
Ashwagandha Withania somnifera
Balm of Gilead, False Cedronella canariensis
Barberry Berberis vulgaris
Basil Ocymum basilicum
Bay tree Laurus nobilis
Blackberry Rubus fructicosus
Brahmi Bacopa monniera
Cat Grass Dactylis glomerata
Cat Thyme Teucrium marum
Catnip Nepeta cataria
Cinquefoil Potentilla reptans
Citronella Grass Cymbopogon nardus
Colt’s Foot Tussilago farfara
Comfrey Symphytum officinale
Curry Leaf Tree Murrraya koenigii
Dandelion Taraxacum Officinale
Dog Bane Coleus caninus
Echinacea Echinacea purpurea
Elder Sambucus nigra
Elecampane Inula helenium
Feverfew Tanacetum parthenium
Ginkgo Ginkgo Biloba
Goji Berry Lycium barbarum
Holly Ilex aquifolim
Hops Humulus lupulus
Horehound, White Marrubium vulgare
Horseradish Armoracia rusticana
Hyssop Hyssopus officinalis
Jasmine, Night Scented (Queen of the Night) Cestrum nocturnum
Lavender Lavendula angustifolia
Lavender, French Lavendula dentata
Lemon Balm Melissa officinalis
Lemon Grass Cymbopogon citratus
Lemon Verbena Lippia citriodora
Lily of the Valley Convallaria majalis
Liquorice Glycyrrhiza glabra
Mugwort Artemisia vulgaris
Mugwort, Tree (Chinese Mugwort) Artemisia verlotorum
Mullein, Great Verbascum thapsus
Pennyroyal Mentha pulegium
Pennywort (Gotu Kola) Centella asiatica
Peppermint Mentha piperata
Periwinkle, Lesser Vinca minor
Rosemary Rosmarinus officinalis
Rue Ruta graveolens
Sage, Common Salvia officinalis
Sage, Fruit Salad Salvia dorisiana
Sage, Pineapple Salvia elegans
Sage, White Salvia apiana
Self Heal Prunella vulgaris
Skullcap (Scullcap) Scutellaria lateriflora
Sloe Bush Prunus spinosa
Soapwort Saponaria officinalis
Solomon’s Seal Polygonatum multiflorum
Southernwood Artemisia abrotanum
St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum
Stevia Stevia rebaudiana
Tansy Tanacetum vulgare
Valerian Valeriana officinalis
Vervain Verbena officinalis
Witch Hazel Hamemelis virginiana
Wormwood Artemisia absinthium
Wormwood, Tree Artemisia aborescens
Yarrow Achillea millefolium

 
 
Next Page – 19. Full Circle, Two Years In

 
 
 
 

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5 Responses to 18. What’s Growing in the Garden?

  1. doris says:

    Wow! What an inspiration. We are setting up our place along permaculture principles after having completed my PDC last year, and we have only scratched the surface compared to this! Brilliant stuff.

    Like

    • Blackthorn says:

      Hi Doris,
      Thanks! This has been a labour of love over two years, but it started from scratch in October 2008. Everything has to begin somewhere! Likewise, I hope your garden grows to something inspirational for others too!

      Regards

      Like

  2. Manjit says:

    Awesome; you have a great passion. You may heading towards creating an international garden. Have you considered adding:
    1. Mango
    2. Almond
    3. Walnut & other similar nuts
    4. Durion
    5. Dates
    6. Coconut
    7. Banana
    Cheers- Manjit

    Like

    • Blackthorn says:

      Hi Manjit,
      Thanks, yes, it is quite a varied garden, with fruit from all over the world! I would like to include some nut trees as you suggest, if I can find room to squeeze them in. I’m currently adding trees to the front yard too now, and you’ve reminded me of what I’m missing. Nut trees are something I’d definitely love to add.

      Here in Melbourne, Australia, our climate is classed as “cold”, so unfortunately we can’t grow most of the exotic tropicals you mention. Bananas can grow if you plant them next to a wall facing the midday sun that retains the heat. There are a few other tropical varieties that are suited to our climate here, and in time I’ll squeeze them in too!

      Regards

      Like

  3. David G says:

    Pecan and walnut can grow in climates from sub tropical to sub arctic. I do not know how they do when they are pruned to a small size though.

    Like

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