Companion Planting Table

  Good Companions Bad Companions
Apples Chives, Horsetail (Equisetum), Foxgloves, Wallflowers
Nasturtiums, Garlic, Onions
Grass, Potatoes
Apricots Basil, Tansy, Southernwood Tomatoes, Sage
Asparagus Tomatoes, Parsley, Basil  
Basil Tomatoes, Asparagus, Parsley, Apricots  
Beans Carrots. Cucumbers, Cabbages, Lettuce, Peas, Parsley
Cauliflower, Spinach, Summer Savory
Onions, Garlic, Fennel, Gladioli, Sunflowers, Kohlrabi
Beans, broad Potatoes, Sweetcorn  
Beans. Dwarf Beetroot, Potatoes  
Beetroot Onions, Silverbeet, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Cabbage
Dwarf Beans
Tall beans
Borage Strawberries  
Brussels Sprouts Nasturtiums  
Broccoli   Strawberries
Cabbages Beans, Beetroot. Celery, Mint, Thyme, Sage, Onions
Rosemary, Dill, Potatoes, Chamomile, Oregano
Hyssop, Southernwood, Nasturtiums, Tansy, Coriander
Rue, Strawberries, Tomatoes, Garlic
Carrots Peas, Radishes. Lettuce, Chives, Sage, Onions, Leeks  
Carnations   Hyacinths
Cauliflowers Celery. Beans, Tansy, Nasturtiums Strawberries
Celery Tomatoes, Dill. Beans, Leeks, Cabbage, Cauliflowers  
Chamomile Mint, Cabbages, Onions  
Chervil Dill, Coriander, Radish  
Chives Parsley, Apples, Carrots, Tomatoes  
Citrus Guava  
Coriander Dill, Chervil, Anise, Cabbages, Carrots Fennel
Cucumbers Potatoes (early crop only), Beans, Celery, Lettuce
Sweet Corn, Savoy Cabbages, Sunflowers, Nasturtiums
 
Dill* Carrots, Tomatoes, Cabbage, Fennel, Coriander  
Fennel Dill, Coriander Beans, Tomatoes, Kohlrabi, Coriander, Wormwood
Foxgloves Apples, Potatoes, Tomatoes  
Fuchsias Basil, Gooseberries, Tomatoes  
Garlic Roses, Apples, Peaches Peas, Beans, Cabbages, Strawberries
Geraniums Grapevines  
Gladioli   Strawberries, Beans, Peas
Grapevines Geraniums, Mulberries, Hyssop, Basil, Tansy  
Guava Citrus  
Horseradish Fruit trees, Potatoes  
Hyacinth   Carnations
Hyssop Grapevines, Cabbages Radishes
Kohlrabi Beetroot, Onions Tomatoes, Beans, Fennel
Leeks Carrots, Celery  
Lettuce Carrots, Onions, Strawberries, Beetroot, Cabbages
Radishes, Marigolds
 
Marigolds Lettuce, Potatoes, Tomatoes, Roses, Beans  
Melons Sweet Corn  
Mint Cabbages, Chamomile Parsley
Nasturtiums Apples, Cabbages, Cauliflowers, Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts, Kohlrabi, Turnips, Radishes
Cucumbers, Zucchini
 
Onions Carrots, Beetroot, Silverbeet, Lettuce, Chamomile
Kohlrabi, Summer Savory
 
Oregano Cabbages  
Parsley Tomatoes, Asparagus, Roses, Chives  
Parsnips Peas, Potatoes, Peppers, Beans, Radishes, Garlic Carrots, Celery, Caraway
Peaches Tansy, Garlic, Basil, Southernwood  
Pears   Grass
Peas Potatoes, Radishes, Carrots, Turnips Onions, Shallots, Garlic, Gladioli
Potatoes Peas, Beans, Cabbage, Sweetcorn, Broad Beans
Green Beans, Nasturtiums, Marigolds, Foxgloves
Horse Radish, Egg Plant
Apples, Cherries, Cucumbers (with any but early crops)
Pumpkins, Sunflowers, Tomatoes, Raspberries, Rosemary
Pumpkins Sweetcorn Potatoes
Radishes Lettuces, Peas, Chervil, Nasturtiums Hyssop
Raspberries Tansy Blackberries, Potatoes
    Potatoes
Roses Garlic, Parsley, Onions, Mignonette, Marigolds  
Rue   Sage, Basil
Sage Carrots, Cabbages, Strawberries Basil, Rue, Wormwood
Savory Beans, Onions  
Silverbeet Onions, Beetroot, Lavender  
Spinach Strawberries  
Squash Sunflowers  
Strawberries Borage, Lettuce, Spinach, Sage, Pyrethrum Cabbages, Cauliflowers, Brussels Sprouts
Gladioli, Tomatoes, Broccoli, Garlic
Sunflowers Squash, Cucumber Potatoes
Sweetcorn Broad Beans, Potatoes, Melons, Tomatoes
Cucumber, Squash, Tansy
 
Tansy Cabbage, Roses, Raspberries, Grapes, Peaches  
Thyme Cabbage family  
Tomatoes Asparagus, Celery, Parsley, Basil, Carrots, Chives
Marigolds, Foxgloves, Garlic, Sweetcorn
Rosemary, Potatoes, Kohlrabi, Fennel
Apricots, Strawberries, Dill*
Turnips Nasturtiums, Peas  
Wallflowers Apples  
Wormwood   All other plants
Zucchini Nasturtiums  

* Dill is a beneficial companion plant to tomatoes when it is young, mature dill plants can suppress growth of tomatoes though.

Source: Companion Planting in Australia – Brenda Little
 
See the Companion Planting article describing companion planting and how it work here

73 Responses to Companion Planting Table

  1. Charlie says:

    Woohoo, this is very useful! thank you so much!

    Like

  2. Don says:

    Wonderful reference. Companion planting makes organic growing so much easier!

    Like

  3. Thanks for this .. I am reading through all your posts…again. Thank you for all the effort you have put in.

    Like

  4. tinyinc says:

    Brilliantly useful table. Thank you so much for sharing….

    Like

  5. Vanessa says:

    Extremely useful, even though I’m round the other side of the world – and your garden is an inspiration. Thank you!

    Like

  6. Mary Gevatosky says:

    Very useful as I begin redesigning my gardens. Thank you

    Like

  7. John says:

    Love your site. Very informative. I’m setting up a small garden right now. Planned on using companion plants, and your references to good matches really helps so much. I’ve got two ultra-dwarf apples, (Fuji and Golden Delicious), two ultra dwarf bing cherries, and an ultra dwarf apricot. I wouldn’t have thought to plant onions, chives, or garlic beneath them. Now, I will, as that will free up space in my 4 ft by 4 ft planter for carrots, lettuces, spinach , some strawberries, and sage , separate from other herbs that might not go so well with sage. I’m also going to plant strawberries as grpound cover underneath my grape vines. I would never have thought to do that until I found your site. And I’m also going to acquire some Desiree’ and Russet potatoes , as well, and grow peas and beans above them. What a great use of space and companion plants. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

    Like

  8. David G says:

    Thank you for this chart. You have more information in this chart than some books on the subject. As I read thru it I kept going out to the garden to add stuff. Like basil beneath my tomatoes.

    Like

  9. Edwina says:

    Do you have any hints regarding growing/companion planting for Sweet Potatoes? I’m in Newcastle NSW.

    Like

    • Blackthorn says:

      Hi Edwina,

      In Jackie French’s book ‘Jackie French’s Guide to Companion Planting in Australia and New Zealand’ – a great book which I highly recommend, she suggests growing corn nearby to atttract parastic wasps, whuch prey on leaf beetles. They don’t normally have much trouble with pests and diseases though.

      Plant sweet potatoes about 45cm apart, and beyond that, they’re a fairly vigorous vine that grows pretty well on its owm.

      Don’t give them too much nitrogenous fertilizer as you’ll just get lots of green growth (top growth) at the expense of the tuber below.

      Regards

      Like

  10. Rob Scott says:

    How do you know that these companion plants function well together?

    Like

  11. Thank you for this easy to read and use table! I wrote a blog post of incorporating companion planting in permaculture and biodynamic gardening and encouraged readers to see your site. happy planting!

    Like

  12. Kevin Bond says:

    Thanks for this table. In the books I have on Organic Fruit Growing, they also list Southernwood as beneficial for Apples. Has this changed? If so, what are the reasons for not using it? It is a natural insecticide, which doesn’t appear to harm the Apple trees i have them planted around.

    Like

    • Blackthorn says:

      Hi Kevin,

      Thanks for raising this question. Southernwood is a great companion plant, it is a fantastic insect repellant, and from my understanding, is beneficial to many fruit trees, definitely recommended!
      The issue with companion tables is that some plants are beneficial to so many things, that you’d almost have to list them against everything.
      I have two southernwood plants in my garden, one growing near a dwarf peach tree, and also alongside a lemon guava (yellow guava).

      Regards

      Like

  13. Ted says:

    Why are strawberries and garlic bad companions?

    Like

    • Blackthorn says:

      My guess it it may have something to do with some substance exuded by the garlic roots that strawberries find disagreeable. Sometimes the interactions between plants are simple to explain scientifically, some, such as this, are more complex. Remember that a lot of companion relationships have been determined through practical experience and have been confirmed and validated by many people over a long period of time, even though the machanisms by which they work may still not be clear.

      Like

  14. Alexandra says:

    Thanks to Ted and your response. The question is, do I now need to dig up my strawberries and plant elsewhere, or do I persist with the current planting and know that I won’t have a hug crop on either plant? My strawberries are planted between leeks and brussel sprouts, I’m in Adelaide, South Australia.

    Like

    • Blackthorn says:

      Hi Alexandra, leeks are OK with strawberries, it’s just the brassicas that are a problem, so you don’t have to remove the perennial plants -the strawberries, you just need to wait till the annual brassicas die down and the problem is solved.

      Like

  15. Julie says:

    I have always read that fennel and dill were very bad companions as they cross with each other and ruin the distinctive taste of each of them. Many people advise to keep fennel separate from everything and most of all away from dill…

    Like

  16. Jenny says:

    What would you consider a suitable distance for avoiding bad interactions. I have a mixed vegie garden and I want to plant single garlic bulbs among various vegetables. How far should I keep the garlic away from the beans to avoid a bad interaction? Thanks

    Like

    • Blackthorn says:

      That’s a bit of a ‘how long is a piece of string?’ question! Trying to figure how far the antibacterial root exudate of garlic travels in an almost infinite range of possible soil conditions is not something you can put exact figures on.

      How far do you keep a dog from a cat?
      As far away as possible!

      Like

  17. Devi says:

    Heyyy,
    I’m so happy that I stumbled upon your site coz I’ve been looking for a plant companion table quite some. Thank you so much!!! And all the best for you!!!

    Like

  18. Cynthia from St. Albert says:

    I don’t see any reference to blueberries at all. Can I plant blueberries with raspberries?

    Like

  19. Julie says:

    I just came back from a trip in the Appeninnes of Italy – raspberries and wild blueberries are growing happily side by side all over!!!

    Like

  20. Lynette Crews says:

    Please tell us why we should not plant potatoes and tomatoes together.

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      Both are Solanaceae (nightshade) family, and both are susceptible to the plant diseases Early Blight (Alternaria solani) and Late Blight or Potato Blight (Phytophthora infestans). Planted together, they can infect each other, and if you plant them in the same place each year, the disease will build up in the soil and progressively get worse, which is why people use crop rotation of annual vegetables, and try not to grow plants of the same family in the same area for three years. Also, potatoes more susceptible to potato blight when planted near tomatoes.

      Like

  21. Julien says:

    Hi
    Thanks a lot for what you did on this site, very inspiring! I live in the desert I am looking after a small garden that has date palms. What would you suggest planting as companions for date palms?

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      If date palms are native to your area, in other words, if they grow naturally there, have a look what plants grow around them in nature, and plant similar plants – especially the useful ones you can use.

      You can also look into oasis agro-ecosystems, it’s a model used in arid environments which is a three-story
      inter-cropping system of date palms, fruit trees and annual crops.

      Like

  22. M.C.Host says:

    This table explains why some areas of my current garden are behaving the way they do -such as the mint/parsley not working together!

    Like

  23. Ann says:

    I live in the south USA. I rarely find okra on companion charts & just wanted to say it grow well with crowder & black-eyed peas, & green beans. Or you can plant lettuce under it after it is up good to extend lettuce production as it provides good shade. I have read it does well with sweet bell peppers too, but have never done that planting myself.
    Thanks for a great blog with useful info!

    Like

  24. Delga says:

    Corn seems to be absent from this list

    Like

  25. Zahid Naseem Akbar says:

    Thanks for all this information. Can grapes go well with apricot and pear?

    Like

  26. Ashley says:

    Under dill it says tomatoes are a companion but under tomatoes it is listed as bad?

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      Dill is both bad and good for tomatoes, so it doesn’t neatly fit into the table!
      When dill is young it works well grown with tomatoes, it is said to improve the health of tomato plants and acts as a pests repellent to protect them from tomato hornworm caterpillars, aphids, and spider mites. When the dill plant matures it is said to stunt the growth of tomatoes!
      The best way to use dill as a companion for tomatoes is to harvest the leaves while they are young for cooking, they can be used fresh or dried. If you wish to grow dill for the seeds, plant it well away from tomatoes.

      Like

  27. Gonza says:

    hi, why exactly are some plants bad companions with eachother, could some one explain why broccoli is bad together with strawberries?

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      Some interactions of bad companion plants are simple to explain – such as why the bean and pea family doesn’t grow well next to any plant from the onion family. On the other hand, some interactions might not have simple explanations, but the effects are readily observable and repeatable, so we know what to do or not do. Keep in mind that we can do something that works without having to explain how it works, humans learned how to create and use fire millennia ago but only recently has science been able to explain the process of combustion!

      Like

      • Gonza says:

        could you then expain the baad interaction between the bean and pea family?

        Like

      • Angelo (admin) says:

        Onion and legume family are bad companions because the legumes (beans, peas, etc) have root nodules which house the Rhizobium bacteria, which is a nitrogen-fixing bacteria – it takes nitrogen from the air and creates nitrogen compounds which the plant can use, basically nitrogen fertiliser. In exchange, the plant photosynthesises and produces sugars from carbon dioxide and water, which it shares with the nitrogen-fixing bacteria. It’s a symbiotic relationship, a mutually beneficial relationship where they exchange nutrients. The onion family all exude antibiotic compounds from their roots, which kill many bacteria, including the nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium bacteria.

        Like

  28. Laura Smith says:

    I have previously planted thornless blackberry bushes near raspberries with unfruitful results. Why are they bad companions? Is it due to possible diseases? I really want success with the my kids favorite blackberries. Thank you.

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      Same family Rubus, same root depth, same nutrient requirements means they are competing with each other for nutrients and water.
      They’re also subject to the same diseases too, but that wouldn’t make them bad companions, it would just make for a less resilient planting design. There may be other mechanisms at play too…
      I’ve planted a boysenberry near some summer bearing raspberries as an experiment and the vigour and productivity of the raspberries has definitely reduced – will need to transplant the raspberries elsewhere.

      Like

  29. Angela Sauter says:

    This is verfy helpfull but my husband is wondering if you can plant strawberry plants around apple trees….

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      Well, if they’re not bad companions, which they’re clearly not, then strawberries can definitely be planted under your apple tree, as long as the strawberries requirements are met in terms of the right amount of sunlight and sufficient water. The strawberries will form a natural groundcover layer, just be mindful of where the strawberries are situated in relation to hot afternoon west sun in summer, you don’t want them getting burnt.

      Like

  30. knara says:

    Hello, does anyone know if raspberries and clinging roses will do well next to each other? thank you!

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      Roses are from the genus Rosa and raspberries from the genus Rubus, but both are from the same plant family Rosaceae. Being related, and not being too different from one another (as a rose grower I have no trouble admitting roses are really just glorified brambles) they may compete with each other in the same way that other brambleberries compete with each other and I would guess that they were best kept apart.

      There’s also the matter of location, don’t forget that raspberries like a bit less sun than roses, hot afternoon sun is to be avoided with raspberries.

      Like

  31. AM. says:

    Hi! Two questions: is there something particularly good to plant near the base of a fig tree (I’m planning lavendar, rosemary and some lemons)?
    And:

    I’m planning to train my figs along wires at about 2.5 metre centres. The wall at the base is only about 30cms high. Should I put brackets there? Will the star posts sunk 60cms be strong enough? What gauge wire should I use?

    Regards,
    AM.

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      Planting Mediterranean herbs near a fig tree would be sensible as they are also drought tolerant plants that can cope with heat and native to the same areas.

      A lemon near a fig? The lemon is a tree which requires its own space, it’s not a companion to another tree! Citrus trees are very shallow rooted and would be outcompeted severely by the fig tree which grows larger and has a stronger root system.

      The wire supports don’t need to hold much weight, they just need to keep the fig tree branches straight and provide a guide to tie them to. See my article on building an Espalier Support/Trellis https://deepgreenpermaculture.com/diy-instructions/espalier-supporttrellis/ for details and the comments below the article. Star pickets sunk into the ground 60cm deep might hold depending on your soil, they might not! If you put tensioned wires across them the posts will move inwards unless they’re anchored to something solid.

      Like

    • Simone says:

      I have planted lovage as a companion to my fig tree as an experiment this spring, and it seems to be working very well. Because I live in a colder climate, I have made a hedge of blackberries behind it on the North side (Northern hemisphere). Although the figs are only about 2 cm yet, there are many of them. The fig plant is about 2 m high and 1 m wide and has grown more than 80 cm since I planted it 3 months ago.
      Also, I have a asparagus bed nearby, but either because of the bed’s age or because of the lovage or fig, it is not producing tasty spears anymore.
      Hope this helps! And thanks for the inspiration for planting rosemary. I will add this and maybe thyme as well.

      Like

  32. Sorry, Angelo, I was speaking shorthand again. The lemons are dwarfs, each in a half-barrel, not in the ground with the figs. Thanks for your response.
    AM.

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      Thanks for the clarification. As aesthetic elements, the dwarf lemons in pots will add visual appeal located near the fig tree, but as far as companion plant benefits go, there aren’t any obvious ones!

      Like

  33. evelyn says:

    hi there
    I know you mentioned lemon trees need their own space if they are in the ground and make for poor companion plants. However, is there anything that can be planted at their base or near them that would be a companion-like-plant to help reduce pests and bugs that lemon trees a susceptible to? I have a lemon myer and its not doing to well with bugs this year and I want to avoid using chemicals as much as possible as I have small kids that practically live outside.

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      Underplant your citrus with low growing, shallow rooted plants. Chives are great as mass plantings under citrus to repel aphids. You could also try planting nectary plants that provide a nectar source as an alternative food source beneficial predator insects that eat your pests, plants from the daisy family with single flowers works well, examples include roman chamomile, feverfew as well as plants with lots of little flowers such as alyssum. Yarrow also works well too.

      Like

  34. I’m not quite sure where this lives as a companion planting, but we discovered by accident that overwintering (hardneck) garlic serves as an effective root barrier for raspberries that throw out rhizomes in the springtime. We spaced the cloves 6″ apart, and only where 2 consecutive cloves failed to take did the raspberries escape past the line – they went in every direction except past the garlic. We have since tested this out in a second location and it’s holding.

    Like

  35. Jared says:

    Have you or anyone you know ever paired asparagus with cranberry?

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      The asparagus I grow would quickly shade out and overwhelm asparagus. They also have different water requirements, cranberries grow in bogs and constantly wet soils. Another difference is their soil pH requirements, asparagus prefer soil with a pH of about 6.5 to 7, some say a soil pH of 6-8, whereas cranberries prefer a low pH soils, pH 4.5 – 5.5.

      The other thing to keep in mind is that perennial vegetables such as rhubarb and asparagus are usually given their own patch in the garden, and area of around 1m x 1m (30″ x 30″) without any other plants. If companion planting anything with them, the plants go in the bed beside them.

      Like

  36. Rob says:

    Hi All – Can anyone tell me how/where Sweet Potatoes fit into the Companion Planting Table, please ??? Are they grouped together with Potatoes ??? Thanks for your assistance.
    Cheers – Rob (in Mooloolah Valley, QLD)

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      Hi Rob, they’re completely different plants, all they share in common is their common names. Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) are from the Solanaceae (Nightshade) family, while Sweet Potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) are from the Convolvulaceae (Morning Glory) family.

      In the book “Companion Planting” by Jackie French, she mentions that “corn planted with sweet potatoes may increase the number of parasitic wasps preying on leaf beetles” and she suggests growing sweet potatoes, which are tolerant of part-shade conditions, under trees in cooler climates for protection, presumably from cold and frost, to keep them growing longer.

      Like

  37. Teresa A Macejak says:

    Just how far do beets need to be kept from pole beans as well as onions?

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      Plant your beetroot far enough from the onion roots so none of the compounds leaching out from onion roots reaches the beets, and far enough from the climbing beans so they don’t shade out and take over the area where the beets are growing. You can always try growing some carrots between your onions and beets and that way they’ll all be happy (assuming they’re all within the right sowing season where you are).

      Like

  38. Teresa A Macejak says:

    The pole beans seem to be causing me problems in crop rotation. In companion gardening it seems many things need to stay away from them. Kohlrabi, beets, onions , cabbage family If I have these crops starting three feet in front of pole beans would that be adequate space away? the others are all compatible with each other. So far in that plot I will have a 15 ft row trellised beans, row of carrots, row of chard. I am trying this companion thing after 40 years of gardening and not knowing it existed. The trellis is permanent . I rotate cukes, sweet peas, and beans between it and 2 fence lines. Rotation is tough because of a huge butternut tree close by which is relative to black walnut.

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      Yes, that’s more than adequate space if the climbing beans aren’t shading out the light.

      If you set up your trellis running north-south (see design article on Relative Location – https://deepgreenpermaculture.com/permaculture/permaculture-design-principles/1-relative-location/) they will not shade out your garden.

      If there are no plants behind the bean trellis, the other option is to put the beans on their trellis furthest from the sun (south in the southern hemisphere, north in the northern hemisphere), with the next shorter plants closer to the sun, and shortest plants the closest to the position of the midday sun.

      Like

      • Teresa A Macejak says:

        Yes that is how it is. I was not worried about light, just if there was some kind of chemical thing . Thanks. In all the companion stuff they always say to keep away from but not how far. This is an experiment to see if anything really grows better, I have an incredible garden, that was way too fertile when I first started 40 years ago and I still have not ever had to do anything. I get soil tested every three years and they have always come back do not add anything. However I did notice my PH was up this time. Anyway thanks for all the input.

        Like

  39. Armida Guerra says:

    I planted one basil plant next to each of my tomatoes ( about 18 inches away from the tomato plants) as suggested by my friend who is working with ‘In the backyard’ ( http://inthebackyard.ca/ ) before last year and it really worked well. Growing basil with your tomatoes will not only make the tomatoes taste better but also repel insects. Actually, there is no scientific evidence on this idea. However, we do know now that basil and tomatoes plants grow very well together !

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      It’s also a very convenient planting when collecting ingredients for recipes that use both tomato and basil!

      Like

  40. Jan. Stark says:

    Can I put a tomatoe plant in a container that a palm tree died in ?

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      It kind of depends what it may have died from, and whether it is just the container or the old potting medium/potting mix as well.

      Typically in horticulture we sterilize empty pots by first washing them and scrubbing them clean, then soaking them or washing them with a dilute bleach solution to kill any pathogens, use a 1:9 dilution ratio of bleach to water, in other words, one cup of bleach to nine cups of water, leave it on for at least ten minutes, then wash off and allow to dry. Works on plastic and terracotta pots.

      Like

  41. Iwan says:

    can I have the reason why there are good companion and bad companion?

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      There are many, many reasons, some of which we can explain the science, some interactions are from experience of gardeners over time, it’s a big topic that I teach a 4 hour workshop on the subject, I couldn’t do it justice in a short answer, perhaps that should be what I write an eBook about!

      Like

  42. Stephanie Guajardo says:

    I’m wondering if I can plant sunflowers between my pepper plants?

    Like

    • Angelo (admin) says:

      According to the companion planting table the good companions for sunflowers are Squash, Cucumber and the bad companions for sunflowers are Potatoes.
      You have to keep in mind other factors such as shading and competition for nutrients – Sunflowers are very tall, fast growing, hungry plants which will outcompete many other plants. This is confirmed in the Jackie French in her book “Companion Planting in Australia and New Zealand” where she states “Sunflowers reduce the yield of many crops grown with them”. I would plant the tall sunflowers in the background, furthest from the midday sun so they don’t shade anything out, and plant your peppers well away from them.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s